Monday, August 22, 2016 - 04:00 • Itai Vardi

Numerous rulings by a former Commissioner of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) favored energy companies his lobbyist wife worked for at the time, a DeSmog investigation can reveal.

Philip Moeller left FERC in late 2015 after nearly ten years on the Commission.

Throughout his entire tenure, Moeller’s wife, Elizabeth Moeller, was employed as a lawyer and lobbyist for the Washington DC-based firm Pillsbury, Winthrop, Shaw & Pittman LLP (Pillsbury Winthrop).

According to internal FERC documents obtained by DeSmog, the Commission’s counsel repeatedly authorized Moeller to rule on matters concerning companies represented by his wife or others at Pillsbury Winthrop.

Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 11:49 • Judith Lavoie
Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw First Nation eviction notice to Cermaq
Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw First Nation eviction notice to Cermaq

Members of the Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw First Nation say salmon farms in their territory are destroying wild salmon runs and polluting clam beds and they must leave.

On Thursday and Friday a small flotilla of boats from Kingcome Village, Gilford Village and Alert Bay, with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society’s research vessel “Martin Sheen” in the background, handed eviction notices to four Cermaq Canada salmon farms. Hereditary chiefs say notices will be issued to all 27 farms in their territory.

With chiefs in traditional robes, drumming and singing, the group ignored efforts by Cermaq employees to prevent them from landing, handed over the notice and then held a cleansing ceremony and wild salmon barbecue at one of the farms.

Our people have spoken. We want salmon farms out of our territory,” said chief councillor Willie Moon, the first to pull into the farm off northern Vancouver Island.

Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 10:00 • Simon Davis-Cohen
Protesters march down an Ohio street carrying anti-fracking signs.
Protesters march down an Ohio street carrying anti-fracking signs.

For years, local Ohioans have been told by courts and elected officials that they have no control over fracking — “it is a matter of state law.”

However, groups of determined residents are refusing to accept this argument, taking steps to establish local democratic control over what they see as vital societal questions of health, safety, and planetary survival. But not without resistance from their own governments.

Friday, August 19, 2016 - 04:00 • Mike Gaworecki

A new analysis by a non-partisan business group finds that California’s climate policies have been a boon for the state’s economy.

Assembly Bill 32, also known as AB 32 or the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, requires California to reduce climate-cooking greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 — which meant cutting emissions about 25 percent from where they were at in 2006, when AB 32 was passed by the California State Legislature and signed into law by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

According to the analysis from Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2analysis, AB 32 and related climate policies have pumped some $48 billion into the state economy over the past decade while helping create about 500,000 jobs.

Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 19:38 • Julie Dermansky

The largest flooding event in Louisiana’s history — and the worst natural disaster to hit the United States since Hurricane Sandy in 2012 — is not over.

As I write, new areas in the southern part of the state are taking on water from rising creeks and bayous. 

Last Friday, the greater Baton Rouge area received more than 30 inches of rain in less than 48 hours. Many rivers crested at record-breaking heights, and the run-off from those rivers is now flooding areas further to the south. 

On Monday, three days after the rain event began, I flew with the Louisiana National Guard in a Black Hawk helicopter to survey the flood damage. From the air, I was able to take in the vast reach of the disaster.

Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 16:39 • Emma Gilchrist

It’s 31 degrees outside and I was planning to go to the lake this afternoon — and I’d be willing to hazard a guess that many British Columbians are in the same boat.

That’s exactly why B.C. Premier Christy Clark chose tomorrow to release her Climate Action Plan —originally scheduled for release nearly six months ago.

Politicans often “take out the trash” on Fridays during the dog days of summer and this time is no different.

The plan — according to a leak in the Globe and Mail today — will fail to increase the carbon tax or update greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Those were two of the cornerstone recommendations from the province’s own expert committee.

The depths of August on a Friday afternoon is not the time you release a plan that you want a lot of people to pay attention to,” said Josha MacNab, B.C. director for the Pembina Institute.

Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 04:00 • Graham Readfearn

Following up on her reporting into a new pro-fossil fuel organization, Fueling U.S Forward, DeSmog reporter Sharon Kelly appeared on The Thom Hartmann Program on Tuesday.

Fueling US Forward made its first major public appearance at the Red State Gathering 2016 on Saturday, with President and CEO Charles Drevna describing their initiative, which he said planned to call attention to the “positives” of fossil fuels.

Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 00:01 • Guest
Great Barrier Reef aerial view
Great Barrier Reef aerial view

By Climate Extremes Research Fellow, University of Melbourne and Research Fellow in Climate and Water Resources, University of Melbourne.

The United Nations climate change conference held last year in Paris had the aim of tackling future climate change. After the deadlocks and weak measures that arose at previous meetings, such as Copenhagen in 2009, the Paris summit was different. The resulting Paris Agreementcommitted to:

Holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, recognising that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.

The agreement was widely met with cautious optimism. Certainly, some of the media were pleased with the outcome while acknowledging the deal’s limitations.

Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 18:01 • Guest

This is a guest post from ClimateDenierRoundup crossposted from Daily Kos.

What do esteemed physicist Brian Cox, Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling, and Monty Python comedy legend Eric Idle all have in common?

Besides being some of our favorite Brits, they all share disdain for climate denial, particularly that espoused by far-right Aussie Senator Malcolm Roberts.

It all started on the Australian TV show Q&A, which features a panel of six guests who answer questions. Professor Brian Cox was asked to explain climate change to the senator in denial, and did so with graphs showing rising temperatures and CO2 emissions.

Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 20:54 • Guest
Portrait of Galileo
Portrait of Galileo

By Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol

The recently elected One Nation senator from Queensland, Australia, Malcolm Roberts, fervently rejects the established scientific fact that human greenhouse gas emissions cause climate change, invoking a fairly familiar trope of paranoid theories to propound this belief.

Roberts variously claims that the United Nations is trying to impose world government on us through climate policy, and that CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology are corrupt institutions that, one presumes, have fabricated the climate extremes that we increasingly observe all over the world.

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